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Emperor Humayun's Garden Tomb

water The Hammam Hammam Well Ablution Tanks NE Well SE Well Garden Wall Garden Wall Garden Wall Garden Wall Garden Wall Garden Wall Water Channel Home SW Well Humayun's Tomb West Fountain North Fountain East Fountain Chadar Water Channel Garden Wall Garden Wall Garden Wall Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channels Wall Chadar Water Channels Water Channel Tanks and Channels Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Tree Chadar Water Channel Water Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Chadar Pools And Water Channels South Fountain Chadar Water Channel Tree Platform Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Chadar Water Channel Chadar Water Channel Tank and Water Channel Water Channel Water Channel Chadar Water Channel Hammam Chadar Water Channel

Water at Humayun's Garden Tomb

Chadars
The Tree Platform
The Hammam
Wells
Water Channels
Fountains
Ablution Tanks

"Waterworks lead the eye, the mind, and the heart, as well as the feet. The conveyance of water from its source to some elevated reservoir and from there to a network of pools, channels, and fountains establishes the aesthetic as well as the spatial order of the garden."1

A classic hydraulic pattern is "a set of perpendicular water channels dividing into quadrants and creating the chahar bagh." 2

"The progression of water from a decorative niche, down an inclined textured surface, into a stilling basin, and then through a sequence of shallow channels and pools lends sophistication and elegance to the simple chahar bagh form."3

The most important water feature at Humayun's Garden Tomb is the Yamuna River, which served as the eastern boundary of the garden and adds to the garden's paradise imagery.4 Both of these traits, among others, would have served as factors for choosing this location for the site of Humayun's Gardens Tomb. The Mughals used the Yamuna River for transportation, recreation, and military reasons.5 It can also be assumed that rivers were used to facilitated construction, by creating a convenient way to drop off the large blocks of stone and other materials to the site for building Humayun's Tomb.


1. J.L. Wescoat Jr., "Picturing an Early Mughal Garden" Asian Art 2, no.4 (1989): 72.

2. ibid., 71.

3. ibid., 73.

4. S.A.A. Naqvi, Humayun's Tomb and Adjacent Buildings (Delhi: Government of India Press, 1947), 3

5. J.L. Wescoat Jr., "Early Water Systems in Mughal India," Environmental Design: Journal of the Islamic Environmental Design Research Centre 2, (1985): 51.